Historia de la publicidad (en 60 segundos)

Desde el comienzo de la historia, las personas hicieron “publicidad”. Pero como disciplina/profesión ha evolucionado rapidísimo.

La gente de Adobe y Mashable han hecho un vídeo en el que se pueden ver todos estos cambios en apenas 60 segundos.

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Sailor Jerry, tatuador americano, y un slogan con mucha fuerza!

Norman Keith Collins (January 14, 1911 - June 12, 1973)

Norman Keith Collins (January 14, 1911 – June 12, 1973)

Un slogan con el que me encontré el día de hoy fue “MY WORK SPEAKS FOR ITSELF” o bien “MI TRABAJO HABLA POR SÍ SOLO”… Una frase contundente y fácil de recordar. No estoy seguro si lo inventó Sailor Jerry, pero este fue el dato que encontré.

Sailor Jerry fue un afamador tatuador americano nacido en Reno y su técnica estaba vinculada a los marineros y con un estilo muy particular.

Si quieren saber más sobre este artista fallecido en los 70s´, entren a este link. 

 

Jacques Séguéla cumple 80 años y le hacen una estatua

Jacques Seguelá

Jacques Séguéla es uno de los padres de la publicidad francesa (y mundial). Hacer recuento de sus méritos en la industria es una tarea laboriosa, porque lo ha sido todo. La gente de Havas quiso hacerle un regalo para celebrar sus 80 cumpleaños y, a alguien como él, no cabe menos que hacerle una estatua. Pero una estatua como siempre ha sido él: cercano, de su tiempo y que vaya de un lado a otro. Y éste fue el regalo.

Jacques seguela toyjacques seguela sculptureJacques seguela pocketjacques seguela futbolin

Una estatua en 3D edición especial – 80 aniversario.

vía  Wonderful Brands.

La 1er película que debería ver todo aspirante en publicidad: Crazy People (1990)

Por Guido Morcillo

Emory Leeson, un creativo publicitario, sufre un colapso nervioso y comienza a diseñar anuncios contundentes y subidos de tono para su jefe.

Por error, sus anuncios se publican igual con titulares como:

Jaguar — For men who’d like hand-jobs from beautiful women they hardly know.
Volvo — they’re boxy but they’re good.

Estos anuncios fueron un éxito y su jefe le pide a los demás empleados que generen otras piezas con estas mismas características sin resultado alguno. Es allí cuando a Emory Leeson le piden que (desde el hospital psiquiátrico) comience a diseñar nuevas piezas. Por ello, Emory recluta a los demás compañeros del psiquiátrico para fomentar su creatividad y nacen piezas como:

Greek travel agency — Forget Paris. The French can be annoying. Come to Greece. We’re nicer.”
Para una nueva película de terror —- “It won’t just scare you, it will fuck you up for life!”

Ante estos “exitosos” slogans los compañeros del hospital de Emory, se ven motivados y muy felices por sentirse necesarios y productivos como una nueva e innovadora agencia publicitaria.

Luego de que la vean, espero comentarios en este post! 😉

History Of Social Advertising: Timeline From 2002 – 2013 Infographic

history-of-social-advertising-infographic

vía: http://www.bitrebels.com/social/history-of-social-advertising-2002-2013/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+bitrebels+%28Bit+Rebels%29

Estados Unidos, Brasil y Reino Unido fueron los países que más “rugieron” en #CannesLions 2013

Luego de seguir parte de los premios por facebook, dieron los resultados.

En pinterest pueden encontrar buen material y en el grupo de linkedin, ehhhh también!

En marketing directo publicaron el siguiente gráfico:

AWARDS SUMMARY BY COUNTRY
Total Awards
ARGENTINA 25
AUSTRALIA 87
AUSTRIA 2
BELGIUM 25
BRAZIL 114
CANADA 28
CHILE 8
CHINA 26
COLOMBIA 7
COSTA RICA 2
CZECH REPUBLIC 1
DENMARK 8
ECUADOR 5
EGYPT 2
FINLAND 7
FRANCE 54
GERMANY 67
GREECE 3
GUATEMALA 5
HONG KONG 5
INDIA 33
INDONESIA 3
IRELAND 3
ITALY 19
JAPAN 33
LATVIA 1
LITHUANIA 1
MACEDONIA 1
MALAYSIA 4
MEXICO 14
NEW ZEALAND 32
NORWAY 12
PANAMA 1
PARAGUAY 3
PERU 10
POLAND 4
PORTUGAL 1
PUERTO RICO 12
ROMANIA 3
RUSSIA 11
SINGAPORE 22
SOUTH AFRICA 34
SOUTH KOREA 11
SPAIN 22
SRI LANKA 1
SWEDEN 34
SWITZERLAND 7
THAILAND 16
THE NETHERLANDS 18
THE PHILIPPINES 13
TUNISIA 7
TURKEY 5
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 23
UNITED KINGDOM 101
URUGUAY 0
USA 176
VIETNAM 1
Total 1173

Facebook Exchange: A New Way For Advertisers To Target Specific Users With Real-Time Bid Ads

Facebook Exchange Ads Cookies

Facebook is testing and will soon launch Facebook Exchange, a real-time bidding ad system where visitors to third-party websites are marked with a cookie, and can then be shown real-time bid ads related to their web browsing when they return to Facebook. This retargeting option could be a huge money maker for Facebook as it will allow for more relevant direct advertising.

For example a travel site could serve ads about a flight to Hawaii to someone who almost bought a flight on their site. Advertisers might pay big premiums for highly-accurate targeting. Users will be able to opt out of Facebook Exchange via third-party demand-side platforms, but they can’t opt out of the program completely from within the social network.

Facebook just notified TechCrunch that Exchange is currently in testing with eight advertising demand-side platforms, and it will become more widely available in the next few weeks for traditional Facebook sidebar ads charged at cost-per-thousand-impressions, but not Sponsored Stories or mobile.

The demand-side platforms currently testing Facebook Exchange, or FBX as some Facebook employees are calling it internally, are: TellApart, Triggit, Turn, DataXu, MediaMath, AppNexus, TheTradeDesk, and AdRoll.

Here’s how Facebook Exchange works:

  1. A user visits a travel site that’s hired a DSP rigged up with Facebook Exchange
  2. A cookie is dropped on that user’s computer, typically when they’ve shown purchase intent
  3. If the user fails to make a purchase, or the advertiser wants to market to them more, the DSP contacts Facebook and gives them the user they wish to target’s anonymous User ID
  4. The advertiser pre-loads creative for ads that would target that user
  5. When the user visits Facebook it recognizes the cookie dropped by the DSP
  6. The DSP is notified and allowed to make a real-time bid to show the user ads
  7. The DSPs with the highest bids get their highly-targeted ads shown to the user
  8. If the user disapproves of being shown the ad and ‘X’s it out, they’re shown a link to the DSP where they can opt out of future Facebook Exchange ads

Facebook’s Annie Ta tells me the idea behind Exchange is to let advertisers show users more relevant ads. To date, Facebook has been generally viewed as a home for institutional or brand advertising. However, it’s seen as much less useful to direct marketers than search ads because users on Facebook haven’t shown purchase intent as when they search for a related keyword on engines like Google.

Facebook Exchange could change all that.

For example, Ford could drop a cookie on a user who looks at the new Escape SUV on its website, but doesn’t request a local quote. Then Ford could bid to show that user ads stating “Ford Escape: Just $21,000″. These would be much more relevant than generic Ford ads showing sedans or trucks that the user might not be interested in. And Ford would likely be willing to pay a high price to reach that qualified lead.

[Update: As Bloomberg’s Douglas MacMillan notes, FBX could also power time-sensitive advertising because ads are bid on and delivered to users in real-time as the browse the site. That permits urgent advertising, such as ads directing users to a turn on currently airing TV show or sporting event.]

Facebook may make some users uneasy in order to cash in on this new revenue stream, though. Cookie-based ad retargeting is common across the web, and Facebook is going the protecting privacy by not allowing advertisers to combine cookie retargeting with the with the extensive biographical, social, and behavioral data Facebook has on its users. Still, some people just dislike being targeted. Those people will be able to use a third-party opt-out on the sites of demand-side platforms to stop receiving the cookies.

However, I asked if Facebook would offer users an easy, one-click way to deny the social network the ability to target them based on cookies from all DSPs, and it said that won’t be offered for now. That’s in part because it can’t control whether DSPs drop cookies or not, though it can make the call of whether to use them. Not allowing retargeting to be combined with Facebook’s own ad targeting data is a pretty strong privacy protection, and makes Facebook Exchange ads the same as any other retargeted ads around the web.

If investors were looking for clues as to how Facebook could ever get to the $104 billion valuation it IPO’d at, Facebook Exchange should excite them. It shows Facebook is willing to shift towards slightly more aggressive advertising mechanisms.

While just a year ago Facebook ad targeting was only based on user-entered personal information and interests, now both browsing behavior and activity within apps, for example listening to a specific artist on Spotify. Facebook already leads the overall US display advertising market which totaled $12.4 billion in 2011, with the social network’s share of market revenue growing to 14% in 2011 from 11.5% in 2010. If Facebook Exchange gains traction, Facebook could beat eMarketer’s estimate that Facebook’s share will grow to 16.8% of the predicted $15.39 billion market in 2012.

But most importantly for the long-term health of Facebook,  FBX means that users could see more ads for things they actually want to buy, rather than viewing the ads as annoying distractions.

[Image Credit: Andrew MagillAcquisio]

vía: http://techcrunch.com/2012/06/13/facebook-exchange/

Writing a Strong Call to Action in Your Online Ads

Increase your conversion rate by including a compelling Call to Action in your online ads.

The most important thing to remember when thinking about Calls to Action is that online users want to be told what to do. They want to know exactly what you are offering on your website, and they want a direct command to do so. If you ever notice your conversions dropping off, or if you have a high CTR but low conversion rate, the first thing you want to ask yourself is: What is my conversion?

Define your conversion – it should match your call to action

Take a good look at your landing page. Is your conversion point prominently placed on the page?

Your Call to Action is a persuasive statement to compel a user to perform a conversion.

Do you want the user to:

  • Buy a product?
  • Submit contact information?
  • Download a white paper?
  • Sign up for a demo or trial?

Whatever you want the user to do when they land on your page – write it!

Examples Based on the Above Conversion Acts:

  • Buy This Thingamajig Online for Only $19.95.
  • Request More Information Today.
  • Download Our White Paper.
  • Sign Up for a 30-Day Trial Today!

Try: Call To Action: Secret Formulas To Improve Online Results (http://www.calltoactionbook.com/) is the definitive guide for Calls to Action.

Write your ad using the same call to action language on your landing page

Users want consistency and a clean transition from clicking on your ad to meeting your landing page. Build user trust by using the same language.

For example, if your landing page asks users to

Download Your Trial Version Here.

Consider writing your ad copy to include the Call to Action:

Download Your Trial Version Now.

In this case, you do not want to use a variation of the Call to Action. For example, “Get a Free Trial” would not be as effective, because it disrupts the language continuity users crave.

Try: ClickZ, a reputable online resource for marketers, has great articles, news, statistics and case studies. A great resource for PPC optimization techniques and advice.
(http://www.clickz.com/)

Include your unique value proposition In your call to action

What makes your product unique? Why are you different from the competition? In short, why should a user buy from you instead of the other guys on Google?

Maybe you can offer immediate assistance with orders. Or perhaps you have the largest selection of inventory. Find out what makes you special, and include it in your Call to Action.

Examples:

  • Buy This Thingamajig Online Today – We Will Beat Any Competitor.
  • Get Instant Online Quotes.
  • View the Largest Selection of Thingamajigs Now!

Try: Define your Value Proposition. A good article on the subject can be found here: http://www.marketingexperiments.com/improving-website-conversion/value-proposition.html

Remember the “action” in call to action!

Your Call to Action should include a strong and compelling action verb.

Examples of Strong Action Verbs:

  • Buy
  • Shop
  • Watch
  • Compare
  • Download
  • Test drive

Examples of Weak Action Verbs:
Click

  • Get
  • Try
  • See
  • Read

Try: Search Engine Watch has great content on Calls to Action (http://www.searchenginewatch.com)

B2C ads should have different calls to action than B2B ads

Business-to-Consumer advertising is slightly different than Business-to-Business advertising. In B2B advertising, users are more likely to be in the information-gathering part of the sales cycle.

This means that your Call to Action should be appropriate to the product you are offering. For consumer products, strong and effective Calls to Action include:
Buy now!

  • Receive 50% off!
  • Order Yours Today!

The above Calls to Action would not be effective for B2B advertising.

Use these for B2B ads:

  • Test-drive a trial version.
  • Watch online demo.
  • Compare prices.
  • Download white paper.

Try: Consult online articles written about the difference between B2C and B2B advertising and marketing. A good article can be found here: http://www.vista-consulting.com/marketing-articles/b2b-b2c-marketing.htm

Never, ever write “Click Here.” That phrase is an antiquated call to action from the early days of the internet. Nobody will click on your ad, let alone perform a conversion.

  • Other Calls to Action to avoid: Click Now, Read More, Visit This Site, See Products.

Fuente: http://www.business.com/guides/writing-a-strong-call-to-action-in-your-online-ads-2804/